Cogito, Ergo Sumana
Sumana oscillates between focus and opportunity

: Epithets for Basilisks: I saw a theatrical showing of an Indian movie the other day. I noticed that the filmmakers had censored a few words and phrases. Most confusingly, when one character (an Indian lawyer in 2012) hyperbolically talked about criminals going free, he referred to some person, someone obviously guilty. But the audio blanked out when he said the person's name, and the subtitles also elided the name as "K***".

I am so underinformed on major Indian criminals that my first thought was "Karna". But I talked with an Indian relative who hypothesized: they're referring to in-and-out-of-prison celebrity Sanjay Dutt -- who was, in 2012, not imprisoned -- by his nickname "Khalnayak" (the eponymous villain in his career-making film), and they're blanking out all but that initial consonant so that they can refer to him in a plausibly deniable way.

I wonder whether I will ever lose my fascination with the encodings we develop to avoid the Eye of Sauron, to refer to Voldemort without saying his name. Right now I'm seeing creativity flourish on Twitter, as people use "gg", "G________", "actually about ethics in ga-", and similar. My own contribution: "g7e".

(You do realize that, if Twitter wanted to, they could make it so no one could search for that one string on their site, or via their API, or use it in a Tweet, and the hashtag wouldn't work. Closed-source service. Platform we don't control.)


: Hacker School Miscellanea: Found in an email I sent a few years ago: "I'm freaking 30 now, so I have decided to be Mature, stop feeling bad that I don't learn stuff well on my own, and take classes that play to my predilection towards collaborative structure." As it turns out, I think "don't learn stuff well on my own" was an oversimplification; approximately no one truly learns on their own, after all; I needed a more synchronous community rather than a purely asynchronous one.

Found in an old blog draft that I will never turn into a proper post:

virtualenvwrapper and workon

pip freeze

Beautiful Soup

context manager - "with x as y" (especially for files)
Unicode stuff
modules that are often useful - requests, os, sys, time, datetime, codecs, unittest
list comprehension

different remotes
git add -p
What it looks like to merge a pull request

http://osrc.dfm.io/

Written? Kitten!'s code uses localStorage

Laura Lindzey blogs about whether she'd do Hacker School again; her answer is that she would not, though she loved it, because "Programming is no longer the thing I struggle most with." I smiled at the very last item on her list of things she particularly wants to learn about right now, because I'm genuinely comfortable with my skills in that area and that's one reason I can take a break from it to be at Hacker School.

My batchmate Alyssa Carter has the best About page I have seen in eons.

I got stuck on the sixth of the Matasano crypto challenges last week. I'm going to take another look at it this week now that I've cried a bit, gotten a new perspective from Alex Clemmer, and spent the weekend in Rhode Island at a friend's wedding reception. Gosh those trees are pretty right now, perfectly autumnal. I'm also eyeing Natas which is more directly the type of serverside web security game that piques my interest. All this on top of the main thing I'm doing during Hacker School this go-round, webdev play.

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: The Thing You Garden: What are you making? And what are you metamaking? That is, what are you doing to, directly or indirectly, help other people create good things?

I keep thinking about Growstuff, my friend Alex "Skud" Bayley's startup and open data platform for food gardeners (interview). Skud has taught me a lot about open source communities and pitfalls and public collaboration over the past several years, not to mention the geek feminism work she's done.

Frances, Sumana, and other open source interns and mentors at Wiki Conference USA 2014, by Geraldshields11 (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons This past summer I played Skud a bit and mentored Frances. She was already a better coder than me; I helped her grow as an engineer, as a Wikimedian, and as an open source contributor.

Now Skud is asking for AUD$20,000 to massively improve Growstuff's API, and if she gets that money, she can hire Frances to do the work.

I'm so proud that I've helped till some soil and plant some seeds, to make it possible for an open source, open data project to empower even more people. But we only have four days left in the campaign and we haven't even reached AUD$6,000 yet.

You might worry that Growstuff is just yet another vaporware project. Don't. Growstuff works. Federico Mena-Quintero, one of the founders of GNOME (one of the biggest open source projects in history), wrote this month:

Skud started coding Growstuff from scratch. I had never seen a project start from zero-lines-of-code, and be run in an agile fashion, for absolutely everything, and I must say: I am very impressed!

Every single feature runs through the same process: definition of a story, pair programming, integration. Newbies are encouraged to participate. They pair up with a more experienced developer, and they get mentored.

They did that even for the very basic skeleton of the web site: in the beginning there were stories for "the web site should display a footer with links to About and the FAQ", and "the web site should have a login form". I used to think that in order to have a collaboratively-developed project, one had to start with at least a basic skeleton, or a working prototype — Growstuff proved me wrong. By having a friendly, mentoring environment with a well-defined process, you can start from zero-lines-of-code and get excellent results quickly. The site has been fully operational for a couple of years now, and it is a great place to be.

Growstuff is about the friendliest project I have seen.

Watch the video (below) or read the Growstuff blog to see why it's uniquely important to support. And please donate, for the garden we share.


: Lee Iacocca and Malcolm X: I read Malcolm X's autobiography at about twelve and Lee Iacocca's autobiography at around eight. (You know how it is with childhood; you read what's around you.) This past weekend I dipped back into the X, and realized something they have in common: both of them get fired from the number two jobs at their respective organizations.

In their stories, as they tell them:

X converts to Islam in prison and from that point onwards devotes his total loyalty to the Nation of Islam. Iacocca starts working for the Ford Motor Company right after getting his degree. Both rise through the ranks till they're reporting directly to the heads of their orgs, and they live and breathe their orgs' missions.

And then something goes rotten. The top guy in each org is insecure, flawed, can't deal with having such a charismatic, effective, headline-grabbing guy as his direct subordinate. So he gives our protagonist the runaround, then fires him. And our protagonist undergoes the most severe emotional and even physical confusion of his life, reeling from the betrayal.

What next? After Ford fires him, Iacocca goes on to head bankruptcy-bound Chrysler and help turn it around. X founds new organizations, takes the hajj, changes his views. (And assassins kill him a year later.)

Of course Iacocca's and X's self-serving biases skew these narratives. But I still got something interesting out of this repetition, I think, related to what I got out of John Morearty's mentorship -- a belief that, contrary to that old quote, there can be second acts in American lives. That you might rise and fall and rise again.

And that you should be hesitant to love anything that can't love you back -- and institutions can't love you back.

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(3) : Recent Reading Responses: Data & Society (which I persist in thinking of as "that New York City think tank that danah boyd is in" in case you want a glimpse of the social graph inside my head) has just published a few papers. I picked up "Understanding Fair Labor Practices in a Networked Age" which summarized many things well. A point that struck me, in its discussion of Uber and of relational labor:

The importance of selling oneself is a key aspect of this kind of piecemeal or contract work, particular because of the large power differential between management and workers and because of the perceived disposability of workers. In order to be considered for future jobs, workers must maintain their high ratings and receive generally positive reviews or they may be booted from the system.

In this description I recognize dynamics that play out, though less compactly, among knowledge workers in my corner of tech.

This pressure to perform relational labor, plus the sexist expectation that women always be "friendly" and never "abrasive" (including online), further silences women's ability to publicly organize around grievances. Those expectations additionally put us in an authenticity bind, since these circumstances demand a public persona that never speaks critically -- inherently inauthentic. Since genuine warmth, and therefore influence, largely derive from authenticity, this impairs our growth as leaders. And here's another pathway that gets blocked off: since since criticizing other people/institutions raises the status of the speaker, these expectations also remove a means for us to gain status.

Speaking of softening abrasive messages, I kept nodding as I read Jocelyn Goldfein's guide to asking for a raise if you're a knowledge worker (especially an engineer) at a company big enough to have compensation bands and levels. I especially liked how she articulated the dilemma of seeking more money -- and perhaps more power -- in a place where ambition is a dirty word (personally I do not consider ambition a dirty word; thank you Dr. Anna Fels), and the same scripts she offers for softening your manager's emotional reaction to bargaining.

I also kept nodding as I read "Rules for Radicals and Developer Marketing" by Rachel Chalmers. Of course she says a number of things that sound like really good advice and that I should take, and she made me want to go read Alinsky and spend more time with Beautiful Trouble, but she also mentions an attitude I share (mutatis mutandis, namely, I've only been working in tech since ~1998):

I've been in the industry 20 years. Companies come and go, relationships endure. The people who are in the Valley, a lot of us are lifers and the configurations of the groups that we're allied to shift over time. This is a big part of why I'm really into not lying and being generous: because I want to continue working with awesome, smart people, and I don't want to burn them just because they happen to be working for a competitor right now. In 10 years' time, who knows?

Relationships, both within the Valley and with your customer, are impossible to fake, and is really the only social capital you have left when you die.

No segue here! Feel the disruption! (Your incumbent Big Media types are all about smooth experience but with the infernokrusher approach I EXPLODE those old tropes so you can Make Your Own Meaning!)

Mark Guzdial, who thinks constantly about computer science education, mentions, in discussing legitimate peripheral participation:

Newcomers have to be able to participate in a way that's meaningful while working at the edge of the community of practice. Asking the noobs in an open-source project to write the docs or to do user testing is not a form of legitimate peripheral participation because most open source projects don’t care about either of those. The activity is not valued.
This point hit me right between the eyes. I have absolutely been that optimist cheerfully encouraging a newbie to write documentation or write up a user testing report. After reading Guzdial's legitimate critique, I wonder: maybe there are pre-qualifying steps we can take to check whether particular open source projects do genuinely value user testing and/or docs, to see whether we should suggest them to newbies.

Speaking of open source: I frequently recommend Dreaming in Code by Scott Rosenberg. It tells the story of the Chandler open source project as a case study, and uses examples from Chandler's process to explain the software engineering process to readers.

When I read Dreaming in Code several years ago, as the story of Chandler progressed, I noticed how many women popped up as engineers, designers, and managers. Rosenberg addressed my surprise late in the book:

Something very unusual had happened to the Chandler team over time. Not by design but maybe not entirely coincidentally, it had become an open source project largely managed by women. [Mitch] Kapor [a man] was still the 'benevolent dictator for life'... But with Katie Parlante and Lisa Dusseault running the engineering groups, Sheila Mooney in charge of product management, and Mimi Yin as the lead designer, Chandler had what was, in the world of software development, an impressive depth of female leadership.....

...No one at OSAF [Open Source Applications Foundation] whom I asked had ever before worked on a software team with so many women in charge, and nearly everyone felt that this rare situation might have something to do with the overwhelming civility around the office -- the relative rarity of nasty turf wars and rude insult and aggressive ego display. There was conflict, yes, but it was carefully muted. Had Kapor set a different tone for the project that removed common barriers to women advancing? Or had the talented women risen to the top and then created a congenial environment?

Such chicken-egg questions are probably unanswerable....


-Scott Rosenberg, Dreaming in Code: Two Dozen Programmers, Three Years, 4,732 Bugs, and One Quest For Transcendent Software, 2007, Crown. pp. 322-323.

I have a bunch of anecdotal evidence that projects whose discussions stay civil attract and retain women more, but I'd love real statistics on that. And in the seven years since Dreaming in Code I think we haven't amassed enough data points in open source specifically to see whether women-led projects generally feel more civil, which means of course that means here's where I exhort the women reading this to found and lead projects!

(Parenthetically: Women have been noticing sexism in free and open source software for as long as FOSS has existed, and fighting it in organized groups for 15 or more years. Valerie Aurora first published "HOWTO Encourage Women in Linux" in 2002. And we need everyone's help, and you, whatever your gender, have the power to genuinely help. A man cofounded GNOME's Outreach Program for Women, for instance. And I'm grateful to everyone of every gender who gave to the Ada Initiative this year! With your help, we can -- among other things -- amass data to answer Scott Rosenberg's rhetorical questions. ;-) )

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: How I made a tidepool: Implementing the Friendly Space Policy for Wikimedia Foundation technical events: Back when I worked at the Wikimedia Foundation, I used the Ada Initiative's anti-harassment policy as a template and turned it into the Friendly Space Policy covering tech events run by WMF. I offer you this case study because I think reading about the social and logistical work involved might be inspiring and edifying, and to ask you to please donate to the Ada Initiative today.

Donate now

Wikimedia hackathon in Berlin, 2012, by Guillaume Paumier (Own work) [CC-BY-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons I was working for Wikimedia Foundation for ~8 months before I broached the topic of a conference anti-harassment policy with the higher-ups - my boss & my boss's boss, both of whom liked the idea and backed me 100%. (I did not actually ask HR, although in retrospect I could have.) My bosses both knew that Not So Great things happen at conferences and they saw why I wanted this. They said they'd have my back if I got any flak.

So I borrowed the Ada Initiative's policy and modified it a little for our needs, and placed my draft on a subpage of my user page on our wiki. Then I briefly announced it to the mailing list where my open source community, MediaWiki, talks. I specifically framed this as not a big deal and something that lots of conferences were doing, and said I wanted to get it in place in time for the hackathon later that month. Approximately everyone in our dev community said "sure" or "could this be even broader?" or "this is a great idea", as you can see in that thread and in the wiki page's history and the talk page.

Sumana with two other women running Wikimedia hackathon in Berlin, 2012, by Yves Tennevin [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons I usually telecommuted to WMF, but I happened to be in San Francisco in preparation for the hackathon, and was able to speak to colleagues in person. My colleague Dana Isokawa pointed out that the phrasing "Anti-harassment policy" was offputting. I agreed with her that I'd prefer something more positive, and I asked some colleagues for suggestions on renaming it. My colleague Heather Walls suggested "Friendly Space Policy". In a pre-hackathon prep meeting, I mentioned the new policy and asked whether people liked the name "Friendly Space Policy," and everyone liked it.

Sumana teaching a Git workshop at Wikimedia hackathon in Amsterdam, 2013, by Sebastiaan ter Burg from Utrecht, The Netherlands (Wikimedia Hackathon 2013, Amsterdam) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons So I made it an official Policy; I announced it to our developer community and I put it on wikimediafoundation.org.

This might have been the end of it. But a day later, I saw a question from one community member on the more general community-wide mailing list that includes other Wikimedia contributors (editors/uploaders/etc.). That person, who had seen but not commented on the discussion on the wiki or on the developers' list, wanted to slow down adoption and proposed some red tape: a requirement that this policy be passed by a resolution of the Wikimedia Foundation's Board of Trustees (so, basically, the ultimate authority on the topic).

Wikimedia hackathon in Amsterdam in 2013, by User:Multichill (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons But approximately everyone on the community-wide list also thought the policy was fine -- both volunteers and paid WMF staffers. For instance, one colleague said:

"If a policy makes good sense, we clearly need it, and feedback about the text is mostly positive, then we should adopt it. Rejecting a good idea because of process wonkery is stupid.

Sumana is not declaring that she gets to force arbitrary rules on everyone whenever she wants. She is solving a problem for us."

My boss's boss also defended the policy, as did a member of the Board of Trustees.

"Perhaps you misread the width of this policy. Staff can and generally do set policies affecting WMF-run processes and events."

I didn't even have to respond on-list since all these other guys (yes, nearly all or all guys) did my work for me.

Sumana and other Wikimedians enjoying a canal ride during the Amsterdam 2013 hackathon, by Andy Mabbett (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons I was so happy to receive deep and wide support, and to help strengthen the legitimacy of this particular kind of governance decision: consensus, including volunteers, led by a particular WMF staffer. And, even though I had only proposed it for a particularly limited set of events (Wikimedia-sponsored face-to-face technical events), the idea spread to other affiliated organizations (such as Wikimedia UK) and offline events (Wikimania, our flagship conference -- thank you, Sarah Stierch, for your work on that!). And the next year, a volunteer led a session at Wikimania to discuss a potential online Friendly Space Policy:

"Explore what elements are essential for you in such a policy and what we can do collectively to adopt such a policy for Wikipedia and other Wikimedia websites."

Lydia Pintscher and Lila Tretikov at the Wikimedia hackathon in Zurich, 2014, by Ludovic P (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons So perhaps someday, all Wikipedia editors and other Wikimedia contributors will enjoy a safer environment, online as well as offline! I feel warm and joyous that the discussion I launched had, and is having, ripple effects. I felt like I took a gamble, and I looked back to see why it worked. A few reasons:

  • The Ada Initiative's template. I cannot imagine writing something that good from scratch. Having that template to customize for our needs made this gamble possible at all.
  • I started the discussion in January 2012; I had joined Wikimedia Foundation (part-time) in March 2011. So I had already built up a bunch of community cred and social capital.
  • In early 2012, open source citizens saw more and more reports of hostile behavior at conferences; people saw the need for a policy.
  • I added "or preferred Creative Commons license" to the big list of attributes (gender, disability, etc.), which gave the document a touch of Wikimedia-specific wit right at the start of the policy.
  • Sumana teaching a workshop participant at the Wikimedia hackathon in Amsterdam, 2013, by Sebastiaan ter Burg from Utrecht, The Netherlands (Wikimedia Hackathon 2013) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons I balanced decisiveness and leadership with openness to others' ideas.
  • Honestly, I narrowly focused the policy to an area where my opinion carried weight and I held some legitimate authority (both earned and given), phrased my announcement nonchalantly and confidently, and ran the consensus process pretty transparently. I believe it was hard to disagree without looking like a jerk. ;-)

(If you can privately talk with decisionmakers who have have top-down authority to implement a code of conduct, then you can use another unfortunate tool: point to past incidents that feel close, because they happened to your org or to ones like it.)

Indic Wikimedians gathering at Wikimania, 9 August 2013 in Hong Kong, by Subhashish Panigrahi (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons By implementing our Friendly Space Policy, I created what I think of as a tidepool:

"...places where certain people can sort of rest and vent and collaborate, and ask the questions they feel afraid of asking in public, so they can gain the strength and confidence to go further out, into the invite-only spaces or the very public spaces....spaces where everybody coming in agrees to follow the same rules so it's a place where you feel safer -- these are like tidepools, places where certain kinds of people and certain kinds of behavior can be nurtured and grown so that it’s ready to go out into the wider ocean."

With the help of the Ada Initiative's policy adoption resources, you can make a place like that too -- and if you feel that you don't have top-down authority, perhaps that no one in your community does, then take heart from my story. If you have a few allies, you don't have to change the ocean. You can make a tidepool, and that's a start.

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: Some Tips On Domain Names And Hosting: Here are some things I recently learned or re-learned about setting up your own website.

Domain names

There are a ton of domain name registrars out there and a lot of them are subsidiaries of Tucows. At least one acquaintance of mine uses NameCheap and finds it low-fuss with a reasonable web UI. I decided to try Hover since they have, in the past, sponsored the In Beta podcast. You will often expect to pay about USD$10 per year, though sometimes you get deals (".club" was $5 through Hover when I last checked).

As long as I was futzing with domains, I decided to transfer over an old domain name to Hover. In order to do that, I had to obtain the auth code, a.k.a. EPP (Extensible Provisioning Protocol) code from my old registrar (the "losing" registrar). Sometimes this should be visible in the web UI when you log into the losing registrar's site. Sometimes you'll have to phone in. And then you might get a shock, because registrars evidently think it's totally okay and normal to ask you for your account password in order to authenticate you, and to send the EPP code over plaintext email. Sadface. But at least some vendors, including Hover, offer two-factor auth! And the two-factor auth applications can live on my laptop or some other device, not necessarily my phone (which is good because I haven't yet checked whether there's a 2FA app for MeeGo but I doubt it).

Once you transfer a domain, it takes maybe 24 hours for the change to propagate; after that, the losing registrar has no residual effect on the domain or on DNS (Domain Name System) resolution.

Hosting

I found Maciej Cegłowski's "The Five Stages of Hosting" helpful. Right now I'm interested in hosting a reasonably simple joke site, and in learning a bit about sysadmin and deployment, so I want to be able to SSH into a standard-ish Linux machine and set up Drupal or WordPress or similar, and I don't expect my site to need to scale. So I will go with a VPS (Virtual Private Server) provider, under the "dorm room" model in Cegłowski's framing. Stan, my Hacker School colleague who let me interview him to learn this stuff, is most familiar with Linode and Digital Ocean.

I am going to act as my own sysadmin for this site, so I'm going for "unmanaged" hosting. Most VPSes offer you "unmanaged" hosting by default, in which you can only ask the provider, e.g. Linode, for help if the problem is their fault (e.g., "hey, I don't seem to have an IP address anymore!"). "Managed" means you have access to a sysadmin but you pay, say, $100 per month (sometimes less). This person performs tasks such as incident response, fixes if the site goes down at 1am, and help switching you to a new database. The point is that it's cheaper than hiring a full-time sysadmin.

Unmanaged VPS services seem to run about USD$5-20 per month, if they're flat rates, as Digital Ocean provides. (Evidently Digital Ocean caused a bit of a price war when they entered the market, so prices are lower now.) If your VPS operates on a utility model, where you pay for the resources your site consumes, then you have to watch out for spikes that run up your bill. Some services will also offer a backup service, either for free or as a paid add-on.

Linode has a good reputation for very fast customer support; they have often responded to support tickets in under five minutes. Digital Ocean also seems pretty quick. And it's helpful to have a big community of other users who can help you figure stuff out. Linode and DigitalOcean have active IRC channels and web fora, and the Linode Library and Digital Ocean's text resources cover a lot. Amazon EC2 has a huge community of existing users.

Hosting providers also compete on security, or at least they should. Several providers offer two-factor auth. One good signal: having a bounty program, where the company welcomes and pays for vulnerability reports (example: GetClouder's beta program). After watching Matthew Garrett's "Freedom, Security, and the Cloud" talk at Open Source Bridge 2014, I understand that a published security policy also sends a strong positive signal. And I hear that Linode is on its way back up after a few black eyes in this area, and has shored up its security. (Also, some people are beginning to use Docker on production sites, partly for convenient environment management, and partly for additional security. But the Docker developers don't really promise you more security, I gather. And I don't quite get what Docker is, yet, and may look into it. It's not really a virtual machine; it's more like a super-intense and very guarded virtualenv; I'm told it's like a chroot jail but I won't understand that till next week or so.)

For various reasons, security being one of them, when you get an unmanaged VPS, you get a "bare bones" Linux box with, say, vi on it, but not much else. You decide what software you want on that server. And on most VPSes, there's some set of (perhaps community-written) templates, scripts, or recipes for common types of setups you might want, e.g., a simple WordPress blog. These sound a bit like Chef or Puppet to me, but usually aren't. You can activate one of those scripts to run only on the initial boot of the box; you can also write your own, and use includes to nest/point to other scripts. (Since I'm trying to learn a bit of sysadmin, I'll look at those templates, but install the software more manually.) I am not quite clear yet on whether I choose those via the web UI or something more esoteric; maybe it varies per provider.

For some actions you'll need to use the web UI. For instance, once I own my domain name and I have a VPS account and a server set up, I'll need to tell my registrar that my domain's nameservers should point to the hosting provider's nameservers, e.g., ns1.linode.com. And then I'll need to log into the VPS's website and tell them what the IP address of my server is -- evidently there are "zones" and whatnot, but I haven't gotten that far. Stan confessed that he likes Linode's and Digital Ocean's web UIs a lot better than Amazon EC2's.

Speaking of Amazon: I today finally straightened out my understanding of the Amazon hosting services taxonomy!

  1. Amazon Web Services (AWS): an umbrella term for everything.
  2. S3 (Simple Storage Service): just for serving static files.
  3. EC2 (Elastic Compute Cloud): the thing most people are talking about when they mention AWS. It's "elastic" in that you can use software to tell Amazon to bring some more resources online to serve your needs, and you don't need to physically haul plastic and silicon around, but you do need to explicitly manage that elasticity as needs change, as is the case for about all VPSes.

And now I understand more about "elasticity". Heroku et alia (the "Monasteries" as Cegłowski calls them) provide more insta-elasticity, as the provider senses your growing or waning needs and accords you commensurate resources. Many monasteries offer a free tier, but costs can grow rapidly (cost evidently played a part in the RapGenius/Heroku tiff).

(If you just want to run a reasonably simple WordPress/Drupal/similar web app on your site and don't need or want to SSH in, there exist hosts like Dreamhost; one Dreamhost plan offers you FTP plus a web UI. For another variation, you could do what my friend Skud does, and use Dreamhost VPS to get SSH and, say, cron, but not root or sudo. That's a decent compromise for Skud; they can use it for their personal stuff (mostly WordPress and MediaWiki), set cronjobs for backups, write scripts, and generally poke around in the file system, but they can't install stuff or configure major services, since one must set up new user accounts, mailing lists, or web hosts via a web UI config panel.)

So, next step: choosing a provider, spinning up a server, loading it up, and pointing my new domain name at it!

Thanks to Stan Schwertly, a fellow Hacker Schooler, for talking me through a bunch of the hosting stuff! All errors and oversimplifications are my own.

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